CineVue

Film reviews and more

Month: September 2021

Film Review: No Time to Die

Advertisements ★★★★☆ Out with the old and in with the new? Well, not exactly. Acutely aware of where it has been but laying the groundwork for where it may go next, No Time to Die marks a significant […]

Film Review: Balloon

Advertisements ★★★★★ Pre-eminent Tibetan director Pema Tseden returns to screens with his latest, finally released in the UK after premiering at the Venice Film Festival two years ago. Balloon is a poetic, bleak, funny, and deeply […]

Film Review: The Alpinist

Advertisements ★★★★☆ Filmmaking partners Peter Mortimer and Nick Rosen, known for their extensive documentary work on climbing and for their Reel Rock Film Tour films, set their sights on Marc-André Leclerc, a legend in the climbing […]

Ten motivational movies for students

Advertisements Cinema is a great source of motivation and inspiration. And sometimes it is all one needs to get back on track even if college life gets pretty tough. Students have to handle so many responsibilities […]

Film Review: The Story of Looking

Advertisements ★★★★☆ In the midst of the Covid-19 lockdown, prolific director and cinephile Mark Cousins adapts his book of the same name into a visual study of the art of looking at the world. Cousins’ films […]

Film Review: Rose Plays Julie

Advertisements ★★★★★ In Rose Plays Julie, the latest from dynamic duo Christine Molloy and Joe Lawlor, a child of adoption studying veterinary medicine decides to seek out her biological mother and father. Her journey of discovery […]

Film Review: Prisoners of the Ghostland

Advertisements ★★★☆☆ Sion Sono’s debut film in the English language is an East-meets-West genre medley centred on the hero monomyth, and crucially the samurai movie’s influence on both the modern western and post-apocalyptic actioner. Meanwhile, Nicolas […]

Four films for students on a rainy day

Advertisements We have had more than enough sitting at home throughout the last year. Now is the perfect time to get vaccinated and catch up on traveling and social activities you’ve been missing out on. However, […]

Film Review: Herself

Advertisements ★★★★☆ A Dublin-set kitchen sink drama for the modern era, Phyllida Lloyd’s strong third feature, Herself, is as much an indictment of the grinding bureaucracy failing to house and protect women abused at the hands of […]

Film Review: The Servant

Advertisements ★★★★★ The first in a trilogy of Harold Pinter and Joseph Losey collaborations that also includes Accident (1967) and The Go-Between (1970) and re-released this week in glorious 4K, The Servant (1963) is a tense psychological drama that studies the theme […]

Film Review: The Lost Leonardo

Advertisements ★★★★☆ Ten years ago, London’s National Gallery exhibited a heavily restored Salvator Mundi, allegedly painted by Leonardo da Vinci, the attribution of which is fiercely contested. Tracing the painting from discovery to its eventual record-breaking […]

Film Review: Wildfire

Advertisements ★★★★☆ In the months leading up to the UK’s departure from the European Union, troubled Kelly (the late Nika McGuigan) returns to her and her sister Lauren’s (Nora-Jane Noone) Northern Irish hometown after disappearing a […]

Film Review: Annette

Advertisements ★★★★★ “Counterintuitive, baby,” Adam Driver and Marion Cotillard sing to each other early on in Leos Carax’s latest Annette – and indeed it is. As with every good musical, there’s a grasp of the magnificent […]

Film Review: Second Spring

Advertisements ★★★★☆ Degenerating health and the nearing horizon of mortality are handled sensitively in director Andy Kelleher’s lyrical debut fiction feature. Second Spring is a film about endurance and acceptance, tackling its subject matter with quiet poise […]