Interview: Yorgos Lanthimos, The Killing of a Sacred Deer

To some, the name Yorgos Lanthimos may not immediately spring to mind, but his films certainly will. His latest effort, the Palme d’or-nominated The Killing of a Sacred Deer, once again reunites him with acclaimed actor Colin Farrell in a darkly comic revenger. We sat down with Yorgos during the London Film Festival to discuss…

Interview: Barry Keoghan, The Killing of a Sacred Deer

Barry Keoghan’s latest role sees him tackle something a little different: the unhinged teen, Martin, in Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Killing of a Sacred Deer. We sat down with Keoghan to talk to him about his new villainous role, his favourite directors and spaghetti. Richard Hayward: I have been fortunate enough to see a lot of…

Film Review: 78/52

★★★★☆ Alexandre O. Philippe’s 78/52 tells us everything we wanted to know about Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, but were afraid to ask. It’s 90 minutes of riveting analysis and forensic insight into a film which truly can boast the distinction of changing genre cinema.1960 was a seminal year for horror. Along with Hitchcock’s Psycho, audiences and…

Film Review: Thor: Ragnarok

★★★★☆ New Zealand director Taika Waititi brings his comic skills to the latest Marvel instalment Thor: Ragnarok – a gleefully rainbow-coloured romp that feels like a Saturday morning cartoon on a big budget, packed with the director’s brand of off-beat humour.We begin with a laboured prologue explaining the film’s title, informing us that Asgard, the…

Film Review: The Snowman

★★☆☆☆ Harry Hole is a barely functional alcoholic, but he’s also the best detective on the Oslo Police Force. When a series of women are abducted and killed, each left with a snowman marking the crime, Harry must grapple with his own demons to catch the killer. Tomas Alfredson’s previous two pictures – vampire horror…

Film Review: Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

★★★★★ Sophie Fiennes returns with yet another fascinating character study, blending slick concert footage with impromptu, intimate filming of musician and fashion icon Grace Jones as she darts between America, Europe and Jamaica – a force of vitality and glamour. Because there is no one else quite like Grace Jones, it stands to reason that…

Film Review: Deliver Us (Liberami)

★★★☆☆ In select UK cinemas this week, Italian director Federica Di Giacomo eschews genre sensationalism for her Palermo-set exorcism documentary Deliver Us (Liberami), which is far more interested in its human subjects than it is in the demonic.Of course, the very notion of a religious procedure to rid people of evil spirits may seem like genre…

Film Review: Call Me by Your Name

★★★★★ Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me by Your Name completes the Italian director’s trilogy of desire. Based on the novel of the same name by André Aciman, this luxurious coming-of-age tale is a portrait of youthful infatuation complete with its highs and lows.Guadagnino’s latest recounts a summer romance in 1980s Northern Italy between a precocious 17-year-old…

Interview: Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy, Breathe

Ahead of its release in UK cinemas nationwide, our very own Zoe Margolis sat down with British Breathe stars Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy to chat about their experience of shooting the film and of working with director Andy Serkis.Zoe Margolis: How does it feel to play a real life person? And not just a…

Film Review: Breathe

★★★★☆ From Andy Serkis’ production company The Imaginarium, Breathe marks Serkis’ feature directorial debut and, as a romantic tearjerker, is a departure from the usual VFX-heavy fantasy movies we’re familiar with seeing him in.Written by William Nicholson, Breathe is the remarkable, and moving true story of producer Jonathan Cavendish’s parents Robin (Andrew Garfield) and Diana…

DVD Review: The Party

★★★☆☆ Hrundi (Peter Sellers) is an Indian actor freshly fired due to his bumbling clumsiness. But a mix up means that instead of being blacklisted, he is invited to an exclusive Hollywood party. Cue plenty of pratfalls, mishaps and other comic shenanigans.Blake Edwards’ The Party, a 1968 vehicle for Peter Sellers, is fondly remembered, and…

DVD Review: Getting Any?

★★☆☆☆ Driven by bedroom walls covered in pornography and his childish erotic fantasies, Asao (Duncan) is a young man determined to get laid. Through a series of schemes to attract women, he finds himself in increasingly bizarre and surreal scenarios.No one could ever accuse the Japanese auteur ‘Beat’ Takeshi Kitano of being a conventional filmmaker….