Oscars 2019: Green Book wins Best Picture, Colman is Best Actress

Several surprise wins livened up an otherwise low-key 91st Academy Awards, with Green Book trumping Roma to Best Picture and Olivia Colman besting Glenn Close for her role as Queen Anne in Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Favourite. Freddie Mercury biopic Bohemian Rhapsody won the most awards on the night with four, including Best Actor for Rami Malek, while Roma and Black Panther both took Continue Reading

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Film Review: Chi-Town

★★★☆☆ Selected for last year’s SXSW, Nick Budabin’s compelling fly-on-the-wall sports documentary Chi-Town (available now on iTunes) follows Chicago-born African-American college basketball star, Keifer Sykes, over the course of several years, as he pursues his big dream of playing in the NBA. At a swift and precise 79 minutes, Chi-Town Continue Reading

Berlin 2019: So Long, My Son review

★★★★☆ Sixth generation director Wang Xiaoshuai returns to Berlin with a decade-spanning family drama set against some of the most turbulent events in recent Chinese history. At just over three-hours, So Long, My Son is an emotionally wrenching film that’s epic in scope but intimate in feeling. Depicting China’s difficult transition Continue Reading

Film Review: The Lady Eve

★★★★★ To modern audiences, screwball comedies serve as slapstick forms of the moving image. Yet, behind this, they unbalance gender politics in placing the dim-witted male against an intellectually superior female protagonist. No exception to this is Preston Sturges’ The Lady Eve starring Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda. Fighting his Continue Reading

Film Review: Jellyfish

★★★☆☆ Jellyfish delivers a thoughtful commentary on theatre and art through a bleak narrative of broken family life. It’s anchored by a strong performance from BIFA-nominated Liv Hill and a few downright hilarious punchlines, though the film suffers from an underdeveloped cast of supporting characters and some over-the-top dialogue. Against Continue Reading

Berlin 2019: Bait review

★★★★☆ Bait joins a recent spate of British films that have abandoned the cities to depict a countryside in crisis. But, unlike social-realist dramas like The Levelling, Dark River and God’s Own Country, Mark Jenkin’s wonderfully weird debut subverts the kitchen sink template to create one of Berlin’s most original Continue Reading